Al Cicchetto (義麵坊小酒館) at Eslite SpectrumAl Cicchetto (義麵坊小酒館) @ Eslite SpectrumAddress: No. 88 Yanchang Rd. (see bottom of post for…View Post

Al Cicchetto (義麵坊小酒館) at Eslite Spectrum

Al Cicchetto (義麵坊小酒館) @ Eslite Spectrum
Address: No. 88 Yanchang Rd. (see bottom of post for…

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Mia Cucina: LA Vegetarian-Style, in TaipeiMia Cucina
Address: 48 Dexing W Rd.  (德行西路48號)
Hours: Mon-Fri 11:00am-10:00pm, Sat-Sun…View Post

Mia Cucina: LA Vegetarian-Style, in Taipei

Mia Cucina
Address: 
48 Dexing W Rd.  (德行西路48號)
Hours: 
Mon-Fri 11:00am-10:00pm, Sat-Sun…

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Drip Cafe (Home of the Taiwanese Cronut)Drip CafeAddress: No. 36, Lane 553, Sec. 4, Zhongxiao E. Rd.Hours: Mon-Sun 11:30-10:00pm (but we…View Post

Drip Cafe (Home of the Taiwanese Cronut)

Drip Cafe
Address: No. 36, Lane 553, Sec. 4, Zhongxiao E. Rd.
Hours: Mon-Sun 11:30-10:00pm (but we…

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Follow Me on Pinterest!You can directly click on the above image to get to my Pinterest page, and click here to get your…View Post

Follow Me on Pinterest!

You can directly click on the above image to get to my Pinterest page, and click here to get your…

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Last week, I came on the scene to inform you all about Taipei’s IKEA… http://wp.me/s2zUpY-3735View Post

Last week, I came on the scene to inform you all about Taipei’s IKEA… http://wp.me/s2zUpY-3735

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Working House, Taipei’s IKEA AlternativeThanks to 500 Days of Summer (and the ingeniousness of Swedes, of course), the “couples IKEA trip”h…View Post

Working House, Taipei’s IKEA Alternative

Thanks to 500 Days of Summer (and the ingeniousness of Swedes, of course), the “couples IKEA trip”h…

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As I spent Monday in a Politics-induced daze, I’ll leave you with the wish that I wrote on my lantern at Shifen Sunday night. In the sleepy railroad town of Shifen, hundreds of tourists and Taiwan-denizens converge each day to paint their wishes on large paper lanterns (my friends and I picked orange, representing love and marriage) before setting them off into the sky, to float into the heavens and perhaps, float into the throne room of God (aka become environmental waste in the mountains) to be answered. 

I saw a lot of wishes for money, good jobs, and even a lantern painted all over with 'Straight As'. The lantern was dedicated to “DEDE” from “GRANDMA”. I kept looking around to see if a reality show was secretly filming. No one can accuse us of not living up to our stereotypes. 

But my wish wasn’t for any of those. I wrote on my lantern: Wo yao zhao dao ai. 

It means, I want to find love. 

And that’s my biggest wish for this year, truly. I want to find love. Not even necessarily in a romantic way, though that would be nice, sure. But I want my fickle, finicky, spoiled, constantly moody little soul to finally man the fuck up and have the courage and determination to love myself and love my life. 


Some of my goals for the next two months. 
Get more plugged into my cell group + start making more friends from church. (This will definitely become easier as many of my good friends are exchange students that will be leaving at the end of the semester.)
Start painting again. My goal is to have two medium sized paintings done for the living room. 
Become better at blogging. I think I’m going to revive my thousandthgirltravels.blogspot.com blog + start posting in there about experiences, restaurants I go to, etc. This blog will still be for thoughts, dreams, wishes…
Reach out to more people. This is one of my biggest goals of the month. Even here in Taipei, most of my close friends are still either ABCs or Europeans. I hardly have any local friends, and I want to change that! This is a topic for another post, but a part of me is still really intimidated by locals + I still feel that language/cultural barrier. 
Go on a diet. I think this one doesn’t need explanation. Oh, and one more word: bikini. Yeah, I think that’s sufficient. 
Start exercising + hiking more. The weather’s been horrible in Taipei recently, but once the weather starts clearing up consistently I want to start going on hikes every weekend, whether it’s with a group of friends I’ve gathered or going along with some groups. I think it’ll be a great way to get fit + get friends. Fit, friends, what more could I want? 

Some of my goals for the next two months. 

Get more plugged into my cell group + start making more friends from church. (This will definitely become easier as many of my good friends are exchange students that will be leaving at the end of the semester.)

Start painting again. My goal is to have two medium sized paintings done for the living room. 

Become better at blogging. I think I’m going to revive my thousandthgirltravels.blogspot.com blog + start posting in there about experiences, restaurants I go to, etc. This blog will still be for thoughts, dreams, wishes…

Reach out to more people. This is one of my biggest goals of the month. Even here in Taipei, most of my close friends are still either ABCs or Europeans. I hardly have any local friends, and I want to change that! This is a topic for another post, but a part of me is still really intimidated by locals + I still feel that language/cultural barrier. 

Go on a diet. I think this one doesn’t need explanation. Oh, and one more word: bikini. Yeah, I think that’s sufficient. 

Start exercising + hiking more. The weather’s been horrible in Taipei recently, but once the weather starts clearing up consistently I want to start going on hikes every weekend, whether it’s with a group of friends I’ve gathered or going along with some groups. I think it’ll be a great way to get fit + get friends. Fit, friends, what more could I want? 

church searching in taipei (part one)
I’m truly so blessed to have amazing women around me, both physically & via that handy little tool known as the internet. though they can’t be there with me to discover new restaurants & explore the alleyways of Taipei, I’ve spent hours with my best girls, forming concrete goals, visions & spinning the occasional fantastical dream. 
One of my largest goals this year, without a doubt, is to find a spiritual community where I can both be fed & serve in ministry. My four months in New York were a scary time of my life, a time that I often try to remember, but simply can’t. I don’t remember a single thing I did there, besides long, exhausting rides home on the D train after work, metal rattling & people sighting. I don’t think I had more than one spiritual conversation in the entire season I was there. I felt so lost, so adrift, as if I wasn’t really present in the world. Every morning seemed like a nightmare that I desperately needed to awake from. I can’t really explain it, but I do know that much of it was because I had no community. As much as I’d like to say I’m some Saint Teresa of Avila-esque spiritual warrior that can form a vibrant, thriving life on my own, I know I need community. I’m so weak. 
No one likes going to unfamiliar churches & seeing a sea of strange faces week after week; me the least. I’d rather hide out in the confines of my room with the IHOP webcast & a bowl of cereal. But this is the truth: that He’s gone before me, and He’s calling me to follow Him. I’m embarking on a quest to find a ministry that I know is going to form a large part of my life here in Taipei. I’m asking for solid, Bible-based messages that stir up my heart to live in holiness rather than feeding me feel-good platitudes that I’d like to hear. I’m asking for a tight-knit community of believers that do all things together: not just praying for each other on Sundays; not just Thursday night cell-group, but plays together, laughs together, eats together. And one more thing: I’m asking to be stretched in this season by the people I’m surrounded with. I want to hear different stories: people of all walks of life, all ages, all backgrounds, all gathered together to lift up their hands to the One that makes life in beautiful Taipei worthwhile. 
I’ve already began going to a few churches; one, the tiny, tiny church of a family friend with a dual English-Chinese service, & the newly-planted all-English service at one of Taipei’s largest mega-churches: Taipei Bread of Life. To be honest, I’m still searching, still waiting, still hoping. 
But thank God, thank God, thank God—that He goes before me. 

church searching in taipei (part one)

I’m truly so blessed to have amazing women around me, both physically & via that handy little tool known as the internet. though they can’t be there with me to discover new restaurants & explore the alleyways of Taipei, I’ve spent hours with my best girls, forming concrete goals, visions & spinning the occasional fantastical dream. 

One of my largest goals this year, without a doubt, is to find a spiritual community where I can both be fed & serve in ministry. My four months in New York were a scary time of my life, a time that I often try to remember, but simply can’t. I don’t remember a single thing I did there, besides long, exhausting rides home on the D train after work, metal rattling & people sighting. I don’t think I had more than one spiritual conversation in the entire season I was there. I felt so lost, so adrift, as if I wasn’t really present in the world. Every morning seemed like a nightmare that I desperately needed to awake from. I can’t really explain it, but I do know that much of it was because I had no community. As much as I’d like to say I’m some Saint Teresa of Avila-esque spiritual warrior that can form a vibrant, thriving life on my own, I know I need community. I’m so weak. 

No one likes going to unfamiliar churches & seeing a sea of strange faces week after week; me the least. I’d rather hide out in the confines of my room with the IHOP webcast & a bowl of cereal. But this is the truth: that He’s gone before me, and He’s calling me to follow Him. I’m embarking on a quest to find a ministry that I know is going to form a large part of my life here in Taipei. I’m asking for solid, Bible-based messages that stir up my heart to live in holiness rather than feeding me feel-good platitudes that I’d like to hear. I’m asking for a tight-knit community of believers that do all things together: not just praying for each other on Sundays; not just Thursday night cell-group, but plays together, laughs together, eats together. And one more thing: I’m asking to be stretched in this season by the people I’m surrounded with. I want to hear different stories: people of all walks of life, all ages, all backgrounds, all gathered together to lift up their hands to the One that makes life in beautiful Taipei worthwhile. 

I’ve already began going to a few churches; one, the tiny, tiny church of a family friend with a dual English-Chinese service, & the newly-planted all-English service at one of Taipei’s largest mega-churches: Taipei Bread of Life. To be honest, I’m still searching, still waiting, still hoping. 

But thank God, thank God, thank God—that He goes before me. 

no safety nets (more late night thoughts, on the move.)
Dear all, I must confess. Up until tonight, I was still wavering with my decision to stay in Taipei. I always had, in the back of my mind, that safety net of the American schooling system. I had, in fact, already started the application for transfer to Brown/William & Mary (my American dream-schools, previously), just in case. 
Just in case, despite the fact that my heart finds a home in Taipei, and going back to American & doling out 50k per year for its schooling would make it sick. Just in case, despite the fact that there has been a wealth of prophetic insight & words about this move, a story that started long, long before I even came to Taiwan this past summer. Just in case, just in case. 
My best friend had let me know that she was always there for me in case I had any questions about my Brown transfer application. Tonight, I sent her an email, and this is what it said: 
"Actually, I’m not applying to Brown or any other American school. I really can’t take anymore change in my life. I need some kind of stability to where I’m going to be.  I’ve already missed out on the American undergrad experience, I’ll never have that window again—and to be honest, I’m glad that I did miss out on it. 

If I miss America, I can always go back for graduate school, but I doubt that I will.”





I need to settle down, and I need to rest. That’s a real risk. What’s the risk & adventure & daring in moving to Taiwan if I’m going to cast a thousand safety nets out of insecurity the moment I move in? I wouldn’t begin to date someone & then immediately begin to calculate the possibilities of us breaking up, or what my plans would be if were to separate. No, of course not I’d dive right in & love, and that’s what I’m committing to do in Taipei. I want to find a good ministry, I want fellowship, I want good friends around me, I want to be vibrant in my school community, I want to develop the talents the Lord gave me & use them to serve others. And it’s going to hurt, but I’m not carving any escape tunnels this time, though the very idea sends chills down my neck. Four years….an eternity! 



But I’m tired of living with one foot out the door. I’m doing this, and please Lord—help me through it. 

no safety nets (more late night thoughts, on the move.)

Dear all, I must confess. Up until tonight, I was still wavering with my decision to stay in Taipei. I always had, in the back of my mind, that safety net of the American schooling system. I had, in fact, already started the application for transfer to Brown/William & Mary (my American dream-schools, previously), just in case. 

Just in case, despite the fact that my heart finds a home in Taipei, and going back to American & doling out 50k per year for its schooling would make it sick. Just in case, despite the fact that there has been a wealth of prophetic insight & words about this move, a story that started long, long before I even came to Taiwan this past summer. Just in case, just in case. 

My best friend had let me know that she was always there for me in case I had any questions about my Brown transfer application. Tonight, I sent her an email, and this is what it said: 

"Actually, I’m not applying to Brown or any other American school. I really can’t take anymore change in my life. I need some kind of stability to where I’m going to be.  I’ve already missed out on the American undergrad experience, I’ll never have that window again—and to be honest, I’m glad that I did miss out on it. 

If I miss America, I can always go back for graduate school, but I doubt that I will.”


I need to settle down, and I need to rest. That’s a real risk. What’s the risk & adventure & daring in moving to Taiwan if I’m going to cast a thousand safety nets out of insecurity the moment I move in? I wouldn’t begin to date someone & then immediately begin to calculate the possibilities of us breaking up, or what my plans would be if were to separate. No, of course not I’d dive right in & love, and that’s what I’m committing to do in Taipei. I want to find a good ministry, I want fellowship, I want good friends around me, I want to be vibrant in my school community, I want to develop the talents the Lord gave me & use them to serve others. And it’s going to hurt, but I’m not carving any escape tunnels this time, though the very idea sends chills down my neck. Four years….an eternity! 

But I’m tired of living with one foot out the door. I’m doing this, and please Lord—help me through it. 
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